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ERIC Number: ED170230
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1979
Pages: 20
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
The Quality of School Life in Experimental and Traditional Schools in Western Germany.
Scheerer, Hansjorg
Student perceptions of educational opportunities in contrasting educational settings in West Germany are explored. Two types of schools predominate in the Federal Republic of Germany. One type, the traditional, is characterized by a high degree of state control of the curriculum, teacher training, years of schooling, and number and type of examinations. Another type, experimental, has evolved since the mid 1960s to mitigate the social selectivity of the school system. Recent reforms have led to the establishment of comprehensive schools which are characterized by a social mix of students in the classroom, experimentation with grouping schemes, humanization of schooling, encouragement of free choice of courses, and frequent change of courses. A study was undertaken in 1976 to compare attitudes, motivation, and achievement of 1,200 lower middle class junior high school students from traditional and experimental schools in Berlin. It was hypothesized that a measurement instrument based on student perceptions of quality of school life (QSL) would shed light on how changes in the learning environment affect students. Statistical analysis of student responses to questions about the quality of school life indicate that students in comprehensive schools have more positive attitudes about all dimensions of their learning environments, are more committed to school work, appreciate freedom of choice, and have better relationships with teachers and schoolmates. Additional research is suggested to determine how to increase effective choice situations. (DB)
Publication Type: Reports - Descriptive; Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Ministry of Education and Science, Bonn (West Germany).
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: West Germany
Note: Paper presented at Annual Convention of the American Educational Research Association (San Francisco, California, April 1979); Table 1 may not reproduce clearly due to small and broken print type