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ERIC Number: ED170047
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1979-Mar
Pages: 12
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Familiarization and the Development of Attention: Verbal vs. Non-Verbal Materials.
Kraut, Alan G.; And Others
This study focused on two questions concerning children's attention to verbal stimulus: How do children of different reading ability attend to repeatedly presented words? Are there differences in children's patterns of attention to words as compared to less meaningful materials? Toward the end of an academic year, 40 first-graders and 40 fifth-graders were divided into two groups; a word group and a color group. In the word group, 20 children from each grade level, observed 30 3-second slide presentations of one of several common four-letter words (all words were in the vocabularies of the first graders). In the color group, the remaining 20 children from each level, observed 30 3-second slide presentations of one of two colors, either red or blue. Following this familiarization, children from both groups participated in a 40-trial choice reaction-time task. For the word group, the familiarized word was one target and a novel word was the second target. For the color group, the familiarized color was one target and a novel color was the second. The major result of the study was an interaction of grade, group, and stimulus type. Fifth-graders responded slower to the familiarized stimulus when responding to colors, but faster to the familiarized stimulus when responding to words. In contrast, first-graders responded slower to the familiarized stimulus regardless of whether they were responding to colors or words. The findings suggest that the process by which words are encoded by beginning readers may be very different from the process used by more mature readers. (MP)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (San Francisco, California, March 15-18, 1979)