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ERIC Number: ED168708
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1978-Sep
Pages: 10
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Television and Violence: Methodological Issues for Future Research.
Hollenbeck, Albert R.; Susman, Elizabeth J.
This paper identifies limitations of previous investigations of the relation between televised violence and viewer aggression and suggests a framework for future research concerning the effects of media viewing on child development. It is suggested that typical research is short-term, cross-sectional, and laboratory-based. Factors which mediate the effects of televised violence, such as gender differences, habitual levels of aggression, motivational states, age, protrayal of motives, format of the program and parental approval/disapproval, remain relatively unexplored. While studies indicate that positive behaviors increase in children after these behaviors are viewed on television, processes involved in prosocial behavior effects are unclear. Effects of prosocial television on children should be investigated. A framework for redirecting research efforts comes from life-span and ecological perspectives of developmental psychology. Longitudinal design permits the identification of cohort and time of measurement variables which are especially important in the assessment of media effects. Cumulative effects of exposure to media violence can be identified. Cohorts of children, with siblings used as matched controls, can be studied naturalistically in the family setting. Although risky and expensive, collaborative use of both life-span and ecological perspectives should yield vital information about the impact of television on the lives of children. (Author/RH)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: National Inst. of Mental Health (DHEW), Rockville, MD.
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Meeting of the International Society for Research on Aggression (Washington, D.C., September 23, 1978)