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ERIC Number: ED167784
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1979-Apr-11
Pages: 11
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
A Survey of "Hands On" Exploration.
Righthand, Herbert
The hypothesis that actual physical involvement (hands-on experience) with the work of a craft will influence the occupational goals of students was tested. The subjects were 2,921 ninth-grade students in Connecticut who were enrolled during 1974-1975 in sixteen area vocational-technical schools which offer Trade and Industrial occupational programs. For admission purposes, these students completed a form on which they indicated their first and second choices of careers. With few exceptions, all these students participated in a shop exploration program in which time is spent in each of the trades offered at the school. In the shop they perform some of the simpler tasks as well as participate in the theory lessons associated with the trade. After a cycle of rotating in each of the six to fifteen trades offered, a tentative shop assignment is made. The assignment is based on each student's choice, the shop teacher's evaluation, and the availability of shop stations. The findings indicated that 55.9% of 2,847 students changed their career choice after the cyclical portion of the program. Also, 85.4% of the students were assigned to the shop of their choice. The findings show some evidence that students will change their occupational goals and narrow their career choices as a result of these hands-on experiences. (EM)
Publication Type: Reports - Descriptive; Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Connecticut
Note: Paper presented at the American Educational Research Annual Meeting (San Francisco, California, April 8-12, 1979)