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ERIC Number: ED167655
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1977
Pages: 526
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Five Thousand American Families--Patterns of Economic Progress. Volume V: Components of Change in Family Well-Being and Other Analyses of the First Eight Years of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics.
Duncan, Greg J., Ed.; Morgan, James N., Ed.
This volume contains analyses of data from the first eight waves of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics. The first part of this volume attempts to evaluate the relative importance of family composition changes, labor force participation decisions, and changes in earnings for the black and white families studied. The second part deals with a variety of related topics: the relationship between macroeconomic growth and family income; how family background, education, and attitudes affect earnings level and change; and the patterns of year-to-year change in earnings. Other chapters cover fertility patterns, labor force participation decisions of wives, the determinants of participation in the food stamps program, and the choice of child care modes by working mothers. In addition, the work of other researchers using panel data is summarized. Appendices include descriptive tables, response rates and data quality, and a sample of the 1975 questionnaire. (Author/EB)
Publication Sales, Institute for Social Research, P.O. Box 1248, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106 (Paper $7.50; Cloth $12.50)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Washington, DC. Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation.; Office of Economic Opportunity, Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor. Survey Research Center.
Identifiers: Food Stamp Program; Panel Study of Income Dynamics MI
Note: For related documents, see ED 088 765-766 and UD 019 014-017; Not available in hard copy due to author's restriction ; Parts may be marginally legible due to small print