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ERIC Number: ED166410
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1978-Dec
Pages: 81
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The Identification of Factors Associated with Sex-Role Stereotyping in Occupational Education. (Phase 1) Final Report.
Ott, Mary Diederich
Factors associated with fostering and overcoming sex-role stereotyping in secondary level occupational education in New York State were identified during the first of a two-phase project. The first phase, a pilot study, focused on the program area of Trade, Industrial, and Service Education. (Phase II will involve an expanded analysis of factors related to sex-role stereotyping in occupational education in New York State. This phase is expected to include data from two levels of students--11th and 12th graders currently in selected programs and 10th graders who may or may not enroll in such programs in the future.) Students and parents at four schools were surveyed, and, following the survey, students in the designated program areas were interviewed in small groups. The results indicated that students in fields that are traditional for their sex (1) usually had enrolled in their first choice of program, and had not preferred a non-traditional program; (2) rated themselves, their parents, and their guidance counselors as more important than their friends in the choice of an occupational program; and (3) were largely unaware of their parents' attitudes toward their studying a wide choice of fields. Although parents' attitudes paralleled the stereotyped course enrollments to some extent, a larger percentage of the parents indicated potential support for boys and girls in non-traditional fields than the percentage of such students in these fields. (Seventeen tables are attached.) (EM)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Numerical/Quantitative Data
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: New York State Educational Dept., Albany Office of Occupational and Continuing Education, Special Programs.; Office of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: State Univ. of New York, Ithaca. Cornell Inst. for Research and Development in Occupational Education.
Identifiers: New York
Note: Not available in hard copy due to light and broken type in the original document