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ERIC Number: ED166368
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1977-Nov
Pages: 56
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Social Factors and Perceived Problems as Predictors of Success in Basic Combat Training.
Georgoulakis, James M.
The social history of 2,200 Army basic trainees was examined to determine the importance of pre-selected social factors and perceived problem areas of basic trainees in predicting their completion of basic combat training. Data regarding forty-six variables collected via the Fort Knox Community Mental Health Activity (CMHA) Social History form were analyzed for four groups of trainees: (1) the control group, who completed their training and were never referred to the CMHA staff for evaluation; (2) the counseling-adjust group, who were referred to the CMHA staff for evaluation, received counseling, and completed training; (3) the fail-to-adjust group, who were evaluated by the CMHA staff as experiencing difficulties not amenable to treatment and eventually were discharged; and (4) the recommend-for-discharge group, who were evaluated by the CMHA staff and recommended for discharge. It was concluded that (1) pre-selected social factors and perceived problem areas are influences on whether or not an individual completes basic training; (2) those individuals who perceive themselves as not having problems, as measured by the CMHA Social History, have a greater probability of completing basic combat training than those who perceive themselves as having problems; and (3) age and educational level are not predictors of successful completion of basic combat training. (EM)
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Western Kentucky Univ., Bowling Green. Coll. of Education.
Identifiers: CMHA Social History Form; Community Mental Health Activity (Fort Knox); Kentucky (Fort Knox)
Note: Master's Thesis, Western Kentucky University ; Thesis presented to the Dept. of Educational Leadership; Pages 2-5 marginally legible