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ERIC Number: ED164696
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1978-Aug
Pages: 105
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
The Consequences of Age at First Childbirth: Educational Attainment. Working Paper: 1146-01.
Moore, Kristin A.; And Others
The primary purpose of the research presented in this paper is to develop a more complete model of educational attainment. Age at first birth is examined by multiple regression, along with other independent variables that have been found to affect educational attainment, including age at marriage. The second purpose of this paper is to address the question of causality between early childbearing and termination of education. Social, demographic, and motivational factors that affect school attainment are examined. Some of these factors include family background, region of residence, inequalities in opportunities and final between blacks and whites, aptitude or ability, and encouragement from parents between black and whites, aptitude or ability, and encouragement from parents teachers and/or peers. Data used in this report are from the Michigan Panel Study of Income Dynamics and the National Longitudinal Survey of Young Women. Findings presented indicate that an early birth affects the amount of schooling a young woman is able to complete, particularly among whites, even when family background and motivation are controlled for. Early marriage is also cited as having a strong negative effect on schooling. The general conclusion proposed in this report is that an early first birth results in a life-long loss of schooling. (Author/EB)
The Urban Institute, Program of Research on Women and Family Policy, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20037 ($3.00)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: National Home Study Council, Washington, DC. Accrediting Commission.
Authoring Institution: Urban Inst., Washington, DC.
Identifiers: Michigan Panel Study of Income Dynamics; National Longitudinal Survey of Young Women
Note: For related documents, see ED 149 002, and UD 018 972-977; Several Figures and Tables may not reproduce well due to print size