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ERIC Number: ED162948
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1978
Pages: 38
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Options in Education Transcript: Program No. 136 & 137: "Religious Schools" Part I [And] Part II.
George Washington Univ., Washington, DC. Inst. for Educational Leadership.; National Public Radio, Washington, DC.
These two transcripts from National Public Radio broadcasts discuss the development of religious schools and the relationship of religious education to modern American society. More than 20 religious educators contributed to the transcripts. Since it is estimated that one to two Christian schools open every single day, there is an assumption that public schools are no longer doing a good job. A parent suggests that children in private schools are better disciplined, taught more character, and get a better overall education. High expectations of these students result in responsible behavior. Dress codes and other regulations of parochial schools indicate lower expectations of their students. In Hebrew schools, the emphasis is on developing a person secure in his/her own heritage, better prepared to live in a multicultural, pluralistic society. The question of curriculum regulation of parochial schools by the state is one issue covered. North Carolina has definite curriculum laws for private schools and requires the administration of competency tests to all seniors. The publishing of pupils' names, parents' names, and places of residence is another state requirement with which Christian schools will not comply. A third area of disagreement is teacher certification and the states' rights to monitor private schools. (MR)
National Public Radio--Education, Washington, D.C. 20036 ($0.50, paper cover)
Publication Type: Journal Articles
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: National Inst. of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC.; Corporation for Public Broadcasting, New York, NY.; Carnegie Corp. of New York, NY.
Authoring Institution: George Washington Univ., Washington, DC. Inst. for Educational Leadership.; National Public Radio, Washington, DC.
Identifiers: N/A
Note: Not available in hard copy from EDRS due to small type size of original document