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ERIC Number: ED162091
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1978-Jul-31
Pages: 182
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Learning Style Mapping. Research Project in Vocational Education Conducted under Section (131) of Public Law 94-482. Final Report.
Reece, Jane
A project compared the use of cognitive style mapping (CSM) in individualized instruction and counseling with current institutional practices in secretarial science and developmental studies. (CSM is defined as a means of assessing each student's preferences in receiving and processing information--for purposes of personalizing and individualizing instruction.) Phase 1 was concerned with research, development, and training. In this phase the project curriculum area was chosen, and the staff selection and training process was begun. Also an instrument to measure learning styles was developed. Phase 2 dealt with the development, implementation, and evaluation of the delivery system within the curriculum. Phase 3 expanded the project into other curriculum areas. The research design encompassed four small studies: secretarial science individualized instruction component, secretarial science career counseling component, developmental studies individualized instruction component, and developmental studies career counseling component. Studies used two randomized groups, posttest only design. Results indicated no significant difference between achievement and satisfaction of students taught via CSM and those who were not. Also, there was no significant difference in student satisfaction in career counseling between those counseled via CSM and those who were not. Outside evaluators rated the project 1.7 on a scale in which one equals good and five equals poor. (CSS)
Publication Type: Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Office of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: Spartanburg Technical Coll., SC.
Identifiers: Cognitive Mapping
Note: Not available in hard copy due to reproducibility problems