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ERIC Number: ED161814
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1978-Oct-21
Pages: 31
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
A New Public School Compromise for the Twenty-first Century: New Mechanisms for Formulating Educational Policy.
Swanson, Austin D.
This paper proposes a system of educational governance for an urban, high technology society that is capable of realizing the social goals of public education while accomodating individual rights and concerns. The present educational system was designed over a century and a half ago for a low technology, agrarian society. While the social and technological shape of America has experienced revolutionary change, the shape of the schools and their governance have been remarkably isolated from these events. If the schools are again to perform their expected role in society, they must be brought into step with that society. In order to develop a structure which enhances equity while accommodating individual tastes, the author proposes a separation of educational decision-making responsibilities with respect to finance, provision of services, and selection of schools. Persons at the metropolitan or state level would establish general educational objectives and minimum educational standards, evaluate programs, plan for and coordinate the development of educational services and facilities, negotiate salaries, and determine and provide necessary financial resources. School-level professionals would determine specific educational objectives for their school, select or develop the curriculum and the educational technologies to be used, allocate resources to specific programs, and select personnel. Parents would decide which schools their children are to attend. (Author/RM)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: N/A
Note: Paper presented at first meeting of the Education Section of the World Future Society (Houston, Texas, October 21, 1978); Chart on Figure 1 may not reproduce clearly due to broken print