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ERIC Number: ED160833
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1978-Mar
Pages: 188
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Sex Differences in the Career Decision-Making Process. Final Report.
Norris, Lila; And Others
Observations of career decision-making (CDM) behaviors of college students were analyzed to investigate how variations in the CDM process may be associated with age, sex, and "sex-typed" values. This descriptive study was based on records of students' interactions with the computer-based System of Interactive Guidance and Information (SIGI). First, the effects of age and sex on a wide range of CDM variables were examined. Then, for groups classified as having values "typical" or "atypical" of each sex, statistical analyses were made of differences and similarities in such behaviors as preferences for major fields of interest and kinds of occupations chosen. Effects of initial status on CDM variables were sometimes found when age and sex effects were absent. Age differences were relatively infrequent and small. While sex differences tended to confirm the usual sex stereotypes, the two "typical" sub-groups accounted for many of these differences. Differences between the "typical" and "atypical" sub-groups within each sex often paralleled those between the sexes. Findings show that there is a precedent for people of either sex who want to escape sex-role stereotypes and seek career satisfactions in terms of their own values. A major conclusion is that similarities between age and sex groups in the CDM process outweigh differences and justify "sex-blind" guidance, such as facilitated by the SIGI program. (An illustration of a student's interaction with SIGI is included.) (Author/BM)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: National Inst. of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: Educational Testing Service, Princeton, NJ.
Identifiers: System of Interactive Guidance and Information
Note: All or portions of the illustrative computer print-out may not reproduce well because of poor print quality