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ERIC Number: ED160169
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1978-Oct-13
Pages: 18
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The Budget and Priority Setting Process--Los Angeles Community College District.
Koltai, Leslie
The nine-college Los Angeles Community College District, which has an enrollment of 135,000 and a payroll of 11,000 and which receives 80% of its operating budget from local property taxes, faced post-Proposition 13 cutbacks of 52% of its non-restricted operating revenue. Three types of alternative budgets based on state funding possibilities were considered: a "major disaster budget" which assumed no monies would be available from the state; a "minor disaster" version based on the premise that the district would receive some surplus money; and a "business as usual budget" predicated on the complete replacement of lost funds. The district received monies from the state which allowed for only a 15% reduction in budget from the previous year. However, because many items are either mandated by the board of trustees, or legal or legislative rulings, 13 out of 42 funding categories were eventually cut by 20% to 50%; one-fourth of these were slashed by more than 50%. Other consequences of these cutbacks included loss of federal matching funds, a movement toward centralization of programs and services and standardization of functions to save on overhead, reassignment of people and equipment, increased district involvement in curriculum planning to coordinate available class offerings on each campus, and increased consideration of creating a tuition system. (MB)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Proposition 13 (California 1978)
Note: Paper presented at the conference, Taxpayer Revolt: Where Do We Go From Here? (Dallas, Texas, October 12-14, 1978)