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ERIC Number: ED158020
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1975-Aug
Pages: 407
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Educational Leave in Member States. Collection Studies. Social Policy Series No. 26.
Commission des Communautes Europeennes (Luxembourg).
This Commission of the European Communities' report concerns problems associated with the right of workers to receive study leave in member states. The study focuses on Belgium, Federal Republic of Germany, France, Italy, Luxembourg, and the Netherlands. An addendum analyzes the United Kingdom and Denmark. Findings are presented in seven sections. The first section explores the nature, limits, aims, and definition of study leave. Section 2 discusses legal bases and presents a paradoxical finding: where collective bargaining is most established, workers have appealed to legislative powers to solve leave study problems; where negotiation resistance is strongest, workers have attempted to further training rights via collective agreements. In section 3 types of training courses (their reason for being, aims, content, and duration) are discussed. In section 4 training certificates and training programs are touched on, and in section 5 control of training establishments is examined. In section 6 it is concluded that training leave and remuneration rights may be difficult for employees to obtain, but in section 7 it is noted that prospects for gaining wider acceptance of study leaves are improving. Following the addendum, each country's educational leave concepts and practices are examined at length. (CSS)
Office for Official Publications of the European Communities, Boite postale 1003, Luxembourg (Catalogue number: CH-SN-76-026-EN-C, $6.40)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Commission des Communautes Europeennes (Luxembourg).
Identifiers: Belgium; Denmark; Luxembourg; Netherlands; United Kingdom; West Germany
Note: Not available in hard copy because of poor reproducibility