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ERIC Number: ED157919
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1978
Pages: 26
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Improving Educational Achievement. Report of the National Academy of Education Committee on Testing and Basic Skills To the Assistant Secretary for Education.
National Academy of Education, Washington, DC.
In response to eight questions concerning educational achievement, the National Academy of Education's Committee on Testing and Basic Skills cited four changes in school practices which have caused declines in writing skills and Scholastic Aptitude Test scores. Those changes are a proliferation in courses with less rigorous intellectual standards; confusion about the appropriate methods of instruction; slackening of the amount of learning and teaching classroom time; and a dismantling of opportunities for intensive study in selective academic environments at the secondary level. To enhance educational achievement, the committee recommends a focus on basic skills from ages five to eight, followed by a broader use of skills and curriculum balance in higher grades. Increased emphasis on instructional time or time on task is recommended for performance improvement, as well as challenging material, beginning reading, early diagnosis and remediation, reading to children, mastery learning, computer-assisted and peer instruction. Minimum competency standards are not advised for the high school level, but a series of standardized tests at lower grade levels is recommended for pinpointing student weaknesses and remediation needs. Mandatory and voluntary national tests are discouraged, due to potential interference in local curriculum decisions. Federal research and information dissemination on educational achievement and standardized tests are encouraged. (Author/JAC)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: National Academy of Education, Washington, DC.
Identifiers: Test Score Decline