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ERIC Number: ED157140
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1977-Dec
Pages: 156
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The Development and Implementation of An Arts-Oriented Alternative School.
Schwartzrock, Herman T.
Spurred by the success of a pilot program in arts-centered education developed under the Interdisciplinary Model Programs in the Arts for Children and Teachers (IMPACT) project, the Eugene, Oregon, schools established a Magnet Arts alternative school for 150 elementary students. Sharing space and classified staff with a traditional school, it provided its own teachers, each specializing in one of the arts areas. The curriculum was based on the premise that the arts provide the best vehicle for teaching the basic skills and developing the individual intellectually, emotionally, aesthetically, spiritually, and physically. Organized in a modified version of cross-age grouping, students worked in several rooms and with different teachers during each day, and had less restrictive rules for behavior than those in the traditional program. While the program proved popular, there were elements of dissatisfaction. Parents felt basic skills were underemphasized. Clashes between the alternative program and the traditional program caused difficulty. Too many students with behavior problems were allowed into the program. The teachers' role in program planning was too strenuous, calling for up to four meetings a week. A detailed analysis of student, teacher, and parent attitudes toward the program as revealed in a questionnaire is included. (Author/PGD)
University Microfilms International, Dissertation Copies, P.O. Box 1764, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106 (Order No. 78-10213; Academic price $8.25 microform, $16.50 paper; Non-academic price $11.00 microform, $22.00 paper; Orders must be prepaid)
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Eugene Public Schools OR
Note: Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Oregon