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ERIC Number: ED156383
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1978-May
Pages: 67
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The Indian Liberation and Social Rights Movement in Kollasuyu (Bolivia). IWGIA Document 30.
Apaza, Julio Tumiri, Ed.
For some time the Aymara and Quechua Indians have been adopting resolutions and submitting them to the relevant authorities. Compiled by the Centro de Coordinacion y Promocion Campesina "Mink'A" for consideration by the "First Meeting of Anthropologists in the Andean Region" held in September 1975, this document gives a general outline of the most important aspects of the "Indian Liberation and Social Rights Movement" in Bolivia and its implications. Included are: the "Manifesto of Tiawanaku" which was signed on July 30, 1973 and discussed the value of culture, the economy, the political parties and the peasantry, the peasant union movement, and the problems in rural education; the resolutions reached during Peasants Social Week (attended by more than 40 outstanding peasant Indian leaders of communities located away from the urban centres of the Altiplano) which were on the creation of a peasant education, the importance of the indigenous languages spoken among the peasants, land reform, the relation of Indians to the political power structure, and the history of the Indian Movement; a discussion of why official status should be granted to the Aymara and Quechua languages; a resolution pertaining to Tupac Katari, a Kollasuyu Indian who engaged in a liberation war in 1781, and the Indian Liberation Movement; the June 1977 Kollasuyu answer to the "racist invasion"; and the Proclamation of the "Movimiento Indio Tupac Katari". (NQ)
International Work Group for Indigenous Affairs, Frederiksholms Kanal 4A, DK-1220 Copenhagen K, Denmark ($2.70)
Publication Type: Books
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: International Work Group for Indigenous Affairs, Copenhagen (Denmark).
Identifiers: Aymara People; Bolivia; Quechua People; South America