NotesFAQContact Us
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED065453
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1972-Apr
Pages: 27
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
A Study of Verbal Behaviors Engaged in by College Student Teaching Supervisors in Conferences with Cooperating Teachers and Student Teachers.
Rousseau, Joseph F.
This study focuses on the systematic study of verbal behavior patterns of college elementary education student teaching supervisors in dyadic conferences with student teachers and cooperating teachers. The major research problem of the study concerned the possible differences in the verbal behavior patterns of college supervisors while interacting with student teachers and cooperating teachers. The Supervisory Interaction System developed by Blumberg defines 15 categories of verbal behavior that can occur during a conference between supervisor and teacher. Ten categories reflect supervisor behavior, four indicate teacher behavior, and one indicates silence or confusion during the conference. Thirty-four taped conferences between supervisors and cooperating teachers were collected during the spring semester 1968-69 and served as the basis for this study. Each type of verbal behavior was identified and quantified as a ratio or percentage derived from the analysis of data. Data from each conference were utilized for each of the behaviors relevant to this study. Data analysis revealed that the supervisors utilized in this study did behave differently when they were interacting with student teachers from when these same supervisors interacted with cooperating teachers. This was not true for all behavior categories of the Supervisory Interaction System, but in several different behaviors that do seem to be important in the area of teacher education. Further implications and a 21-item bibliography are included. (MJM)
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Supervisory Interaction System (Blumberg)
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Assn., April 1972