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ERIC Number: ED064030
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1971
Pages: 157
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
An Analysis of the Continuing Consultant Program and the Development of a Profile of Schools in the Tennessee Appalachia Educational Cooperative.
Tollett, Daniel Joseph
The purpose of this study was to describe and assess the Continuing Consultant Program as operated by the Tennessee Appalachia Educational Cooperative (TAEC) during the 1969-70 school year and to develop a climate profile of these schools using the Organizational Climate Description Questionnaire. Eleven schools with continuing consultants and 11 control schools were pre- and post-tested. Results were then subjected to statistical analysis. Data also included program evaluation reports and consultant midyear summary reports. "It was found that the Continuing Consultant Program made no significant changes in the organizational climate of the schools involved. However, when treated as a group, TAEC schools were characterized by Open Climate. It was also found that TAEC schools were characterized by a high degree of Disengagement, Esprit, Aloofness, and Thrust; a low degree of Hindrance and Consideration; and an average degree of Intimacy and Production Emphasis. Teachers and principals involved in the study clearly indicated that consultants were most useful to them when they helped to develop an awareness of the needs of local schools, conferred with them concerning the need for change, introduced new ideas to them, stimulated a need for new materials, exposed them to new materials and processes, and stimulated teacher interest in self-improvement. Suggestions were made for changes in teacher preparation programs, inservice education programs, and certification requirements which affect TAEC teachers. Recommendations for the use of consultants are presented. A 56 item bibliography, 12 tables, and 8 appendixes are included. (Author/MJB)
Inter-Library Loan from West Virginia University, Morgantown, W. Va.
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Appalachia
Note: Doctor's dissertation submitted to the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee