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ERIC Number: ED063918
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1970
Pages: 178
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The Effect of Expectation-Press Incongruency on Junior College Transfer Student Achievement.
Donato, Donald John
This dissertation investigates the concept that unrealistic expectations affect the adaptation of entering students to the university environment. Emphasis is placed on the effect that any unrealistic expectations could have on the first semester achievement of junior college transfer students entering the College of Arts and Science at the University of Missouri-Columbia. During the summer of 1969 all junior college transfer students and a random sample of beginning freshmen responded to the College Characteristic Index (CCI) to measure their expectations of university life. Eight weeks after the fall semester began, the transfer group again completed the CCI to measure their actual perceptions of the university environment. A random sample of native students, individually matched by sex with the transfer sample, were also asked to give their perceptions of the university environment. Some of the conclusions were: (1) differences in expectations appear more related to intra-group differences (sex and intended major) than inter-group differences (native freshmen vs. transfer students); (2) new students (transfer and native freshmen) hold highly unrealistic expectations in their anticipation of the intellectual climate of university life; (3) new students alter their unrealistic expectations of university life and begin to approximate that of native students within a short period of time after enrollment; (4) the disparity between the transfer students' unrealistic expectations and the perceived environment does not appear to affect their first semester grade point average. (RG)
University Microfilms, 300 North Zeeb Road, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106 (Order No. 71-8314, Microfilm $4.00, Xerography $10.00)
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: College Characteristics Index (Stern and Pace)
Note: Doctoral dissertation, University of Missouri