NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED059990
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1969
Pages: 223
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The Relationship of Teachers' Assigned Marks to Tested Achievement among Elementary Grade, Racially Divergent Lower Socio-Economic Status Boys and Girls.
Fish, Enrica
An investigation was made of the relationship of achievement marks assigned by teachers to elementary grade, lower socioeconomic status boys and girls to pupils' (1) racial background, (2) sex, (3) intelligence quotient, and (4) tested achievement. Teacher marking procedures were studied. The rationale was to inquire whether or not characteristics of the teacher's classroom behavior were relevant factors in the child's success pattern in school. A pupil sample of 251 subjects (132 boys and 119 girls: 62 American Indian, 46 Negro, and 143 white children) in fourth and sixth grade classes of five inner-city schools, and a teacher sample of nine male and nine female white teachers were chosen. The children were classified by sex, race, grade, IQ, tested achievement, and teacher assessment of achievement. Socioeconomic status was determined using the Minnesota Scale for Paternal Occupations, a pupil questionnaire, and school records. A questionnaire was administered to teachers to determine marking procedures. Thirteen hypotheses were tested in the four subject areas of reading, arithmetic, spelling, and language. Two sets of data were analyzed by a three-way analysis of variance and an analysis of covariance. Results show that with socioeconomic level held constant, minority group children's achievement scores do not differ significantly from white children's scores. (Author/DB)
University Microfilms, A Xerox Company, Dissertation Copies Post Office Box 1764, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106 (Order No. 70-15,725: MF $4.00, Xerography $10.00)
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Minnesota Scale for Paternal Occupations
Note: Doctoral Dissertation, University of Minnesota