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ERIC Number: ED059934
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1971-Oct-31
Pages: 29
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Recent Japanese Student Movement (1968-69): Its Impact on Educational Reform.
Kiyota, Minoru
Student discontent against higher education transformed campuses throughout the country as revolutionary headquarters to challenge the Establishment--the state, the military, and industry--in 1968-69. But militant tactics employed by students deprived them of public support; it was this tactic that contributed to the passing of the University Bill. Nevertheless, it was student power more than anything else that triggered the events through which university administrations and faculty members became aware of the need for university reform. Student power challenged the hierarchic structure of higher education, the academic elite and its social ramifications, moral corruption among administrators and faculty members, as well as the raison d'etre of the Ministry of Education. Though student power failed to realize its goal in the 1968-69 period, their activities of that period form an important chapter in the recent history of Japanese education: it exposed the vulnerable aspects of higher education to the government, educators, and the public; it undoubtedly will have considerable impact in the formulation of future educational policies and in educational planning. Student power is an element that cannot be ignored in modern higher education in a democratic society. (Author)
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Japan; Japanese Communist Party
Note: Presented at Twentieth Annual Midwest Conference on Asian Affairs, Madison, Wisconsin, October, 1971