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ERIC Number: ED058140
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1971-Aug-30
Pages: 14
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Toward a Sociology of Being: The Humanistic Potential.
Glass, John F.
The holistic, synergistic, normative, self-actualization motivated, transpersonal psychology developed by Maslow and others has opened enormous opportunities for a new sociology, a humanistic, transcultural, value-committed sociology. Such a sociology would not have the glorification of science or knowledge for its own sake as its highest goal, but rather the enhancement of man's potential, and hence the improvement of society. It would be concerned with the institutions and values of society which can nurture man as a choosing, growing, self-actualizing person. The humanistic approach is not anti-science, anti intellectual, or anti-rational, but there is an attempt to correct an imbalance in Western thought that has downgraded or ignored the affective side of man. Humanistic sociology should not be equated with radical sociology, the New Left, or the human potential movement--it is a perspective, not an ideology. This perspective requires some radical shifts from our dominant thinking and approaches, involving: 1) our images of man and his relation to society, and 2) our images of science and the nature of the sociological enterprise. A humanistic sociology would study the degree to which specific values and institutions based on those values, facilitate or hinder the good society. If sociology is to remain vital and relevant, a shift to a more humanistic perspective is called for. (Author/JLB)
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Maslow (Abraham)
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting, American Sociological Association, Denver, Colorado, August 30-September 2, 1971