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ERIC Number: ED057962
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1971-Feb
Pages: 22
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Maine Indians: A Brief Summary.
The Indians of Maine, descendants of Algonquian linguistic stock, number approximately 1800 and reside on 3 reservations totalling 22,600 acres of land. Most of the reservation land is forested, with important economic and recreational advantages in terms of timber production and hunting and fishing opportunities. In 1965, Maine became the first state in the nation to create a separate Department of Indian Affairs for administration of programs designed specifically to meet tribal and reservation needs. Initial program activity of the department has been in the areas of general assistance to reservation members, improvement of reservation housing and sanitation facilities, and community and social development programs. Future attention will also be directed to economic development of tribal resources, both human and physical. The State Department of Education is responsible for Indian education programs and for the elementary schools located on each reservation. The Roman Catholic Church has had a continuing relationship with the Maine Indians for over 300 years, maintains chapels on the reservations, and assigns priests and Sisters of Mercy to the communities. Sisters of Mercy have staffed reservation schools for over 100 years. The reservation schools receive funds under Titles I, II, IV, and VI of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. Special programs include adult education evening courses, headstart programs, and breakfast and lunch programs. Funds obtained through the American Freedom from Hunger Foundation will fund 2 new projects: a cooking school to demonstrate nutrition, economy meals, and creative ways to prepare surplus commodities and a project to reintroduce Indian culture in the schools. (JH)
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Maine