NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED057032
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1970
Pages: 127
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The Effect of Training in Visual Composition on Organization in Written Composition in Grade III.
Tuttle, Frederick B., Jr.
The purpose of this investigation was to explore the possibility that one technique for improvement of organization in written composition might be instruction in the organizational process of another medium, such as sequencing photographs meaningfully. Two methods of improving organization in written composition were compared. The first was a directed writing program, a method of teaching students to compose by having them read and analyze written models and work with specific skills exercises. The second was a visual method using related photographs and exercises with visual composition to provide insignts into organizational skills. Fifty-six third-grade children were selected to participate in the study. After a training session, teachers exposed 27 to the visual method and 29 to the other method. Each subject wrote two compositions, one using a topic stimulus and one using a visual stimulus, for each of three testing periods. Three comparisons were statistically significant: (1) the pre-post comparison on the visually stimulated test for the Visual Group, (2) the pre-post comparison on the visually stimulated test for the Directed Writing Group, and (3) fluency on the pre-post comparison on the visually stimulated test for the Directed Writing Group. There were no significant differences between the two groups on any of the post-tests; neither method proved to be statistically superior to the other. (Author/CK)
University Microfilms, A Xerox Company, Dissertation Copies Post Office Box 1764, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106 (Order No. 71-10,995: MF $4.00, Xerography $10.00)
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: N/A
Note: Ph.D. Dissertation, Syracuse University