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ERIC Number: ED056742
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1969-Jul
Pages: 38
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Individual Differences in Strange-Situational Behaviour of One-Year-Olds.
Ainsworth, Mary D. Salter; And Others
An unfamiliar or strange situation was used as a setting to highlight individual differences in an infant's responses to brief separations from his mother and his reactions to a stranger. Two groups were observed, one composed of 23 white, middle class mother-infant pairs, the other of 33 pairs. Eight episodes, presented in fixed order for all pairs, were used in which a baby faced an unfamiliar environment and also a stranger, both when his mother was present and when she was absent. Detailed conclusions are drawn from the test situations for three groups of mother-infant pairs: (1) babies whose mothers were sensitive to their needs and with whom there was harmonious interaction; (2) babies whose mothers consistently rejected them and with whom there was an unharmonious relationship; and (3) babies whose mothers interfere and also ignore them, but in which maternal rejection is either moderate or masked. (MK)
H. R. Schaffer (Ed). "The Origins of Human Social Relations." London: Academic Press. (In press)
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: Foundation's Fund for Research in Psychiatry.; Public Health Service (DHEW), Rockville, MD.
Authoring Institution: Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD.
Identifiers: Separation Anxiety
Note: A condensed version of this paper was read at a meeting of the Study Group on Human Social Relations, London, July, 1969