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ERIC Number: ED055673
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1971-Sep
Pages: 9
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Relation of Preschool Verbal Communication to Later Verbal Intelligence, Social Maturity, and Distribution of Play Bouts.
Halverson, Charles F., Jr.
The follow-up study described in this paper tried to accomplish three major objectives: (a) to investigate the preschool and newborn antecedents of intellectual functioning, (b) to determine if there were stabilities from two and a half to seven and a half in the tempo and style of free play--and here we were looking for both isomorphic and metamorphic continuities in style of play and, (c) to check for stabilities and precursors of the young child's social relations. Out of the original sample seen at the newborn and preschool periods, we saw 35 males and 27 females for half day assessment of play, and social and cognitive behavior when they were seven and a half years of age. Data were collected from three sources: (a) a 30-minute sample of free play, (b) measures of intelligence, cognitive style, and motor ability obtained from the child, and (c) measures of peer and family relations and social maturity obtained from the mother. Preschool verbal communication was positively related to verbal IQ, social maturity and exploring in play at seven and a half years of age. High verbal males and females were brighter, more socially mature and spent more time exploring a novel play setting. Low verbal males appear to be less cautious, more impulsive and frenetic in their shifts of activity, darting from one activity to another. Low females appear hesitant, timid and cautious, not playing much and shifting in a slow deliberate manner. (Author/MK)
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: National Inst. of Mental Health (DHEW), Bethesda, MD. Child Research Branch.
Identifiers: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the 79th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association, Washington, D.C., September 3-7, 1971