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ERIC Number: ED054926
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1969
Pages: 278
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Concept Achievement in Science and Its Relationship to Some Non-Intellectual Characteristics of Prospective Elementary Teachers.
Shanks, James Louis
This study focuses on two major factors which predict success in science teaching, knowledge of the subject matter and the teacher's "teaching personality." The purpose of this study was to identify these influential characteristics which affect concept acquisition, while determining their relationships with the major projected patterns of teaching behavior. The samples for this study were females in an elementary science methods course. The subjects received instruments measuring acquisition of science concepts, cognitive style, personality traits, intelligence, comparative interests of elementary teachers, and teacher characteristics. The results revealed that high achievers of concepts of science demonstrated an analytical cognitive style, were described as goal oriented, self-directed women with a firmness of character and above average intelligence, but produced the lowest scores on the Elementary Teacher Scale of the Strong Vocational Interest Blank (SVIB). These women were seen as being impatient, stubborn, demanding, imaginative, and more emotionally insecure than the comparative group via SVIB. Those women who were low achievers of concepts of science demonstrated a non-analytical cognitive style, were described as lacking in self discipline and self-confidence that might have put their average intelligence to better use, but via SVIB were characterized as serious, sincere, industrious, responsible women manifesting a conservative life style. (Author/CT)
University Microfilms, P. O. Box 1764, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106 (Order No. 70-12998 M-$4.00 X-$12.60)
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: N/A
Note: Ph.D. dissertation, University of California, Berkeley