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ERIC Number: ED053540
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1971-May
Pages: 252
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Communication Media and Educational Technology: An Overview and Assessment with Reference to Communication Satellites.
Ohlman, Herbert
In this survey and analysis of the present state and future trends of communication media and educational technology, particular emphasis is placed on the potential uses of communication satellites and the substitution of electronic transmission for physical distribution of educational materials. The author analyzes in detail the characteristics and applications of technology which might be utilized in such an educational communication satellite system, giving detailed descriptions of still-picture television (in which the full-motion capability of television is given up in favor of bandwidth conservation and greater program diversity), of computer-assisted instruction (CAI), computer-controlled instructional television CAI systems, and interactive graphic display systems. In discussing the complex trade-offs between communications and transportation in the delivery of educational materials, he examines the potential of such technologies as facsimile transmission and computer output microfilm for delivering printed materials, and he suggests such wired-communication devices as Picturephone, cable television, cassette, and disc program storage systems for non-print media. He outlines in qualitative terms how such media and technologies might be utilized in a satellite-based multipurpose educational service. [The author of this survey requests that this presentation not be offered to the users in hard copy.] (JY)
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO.
Identifiers: Midwest Program on Airborne Television Instruction
Note: Program on Application of Communications Satellites to Educational Development; Thesis submitted to the Sever Institute of Washington University