NotesFAQContact Us
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED051301
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1971-Feb
Pages: 9
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Black, White, and Brown Adolescent Alienation.
Heussenstamm, F. K.; Hoepfner, Ralph
This study, based on cultural stereotypes, seeks to determine the demographic characteristics which differentiate among young people and correlate with their levels of alienation. A preliminary version of an experimental scale, designed to determine the existence and extent of alienation manifested by in-school adolescents, was developed in a pilot study. The experimental instrument consisted of forty-seven forced-choice items written to reflect Seeman's five dimensions of alienation: normlessness, meaninglessness, powerlessness, self-estrangement, and social isolation. Seventy-five lower division college students completed the pilot version, and for validity and reliability purposes, also completed the Rotter I-E Scale. Then, adolescent groups from five ethnic backgrounds were studied by means of their responses to a demographic questionnaire and the revised experimental instrument. Variables suggested by the literature as relevant were sex, age, number of hours of weekly employment, grade-point-average, socioeconomic status, transiency and stability of family, parental approval of friends, solidarity with peers, and marital status of parents. Hypotheses involved relationships between these demographic variables and scores on the measure. Eleven hypotheses, related to the variables, findings relevant to them, and supporting statistical data are given. Mixed findings indicate the need for further exploration of the differences between groups with regard to such items as: number of hours of work outside of school, socio-economic status, and family stability. (LR)
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the National Council on Measurement in Education, New York, New York, February 1971