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ERIC Number: ED051226
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1970-Dec
Pages: 19
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
A Sociolinguistic Comment on the Changing Attitudes Toward the Use of Black English and an Experimental Study to Measure Some of Those Attitudes.
Bronstein, Arthur J.; And Others
The increasingly wide-spread controversy surrounding the subject of Black English is the subject of this document. This presentation consists of two parts. The first part reports an experimental study undertaken to determine attitudes of some educators toward Black English. Caucasian and Negro teachers were administered a Language Attitude Scale to determine their attitudes toward the following: (1) the structure of Black English, (2) the consequences of using (or not using) and accepting (or rejecting) Black English, (3) the importance of Black English to the speakers of it, and (4) the cognitive and intellectual abilities of speakers of Black English. Results show that language attitudes vary both racially and on educational levels. Part II of this presentation takes a closer look at these attitudes. Educators concerned with the problems of the disadvantaged have, in recent years, encountered an increasing amount of failure in trying to carry out what they see as their basic task. This failure is related to a faulty understanding of the use of language and of the attitudes toward language use. Two views toward Black English may be identified: (1) an older view based on a deficit model in which the dialect is considered inferior, (2) a more recent view based on a difference model which accepts the premise that all dialects possess internal validity. It is concluded that the educational establishment must come to view Black English as another dialect of English. (CK)
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Language Attitude Scale
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Convention of the Speech Communication Association (56th, New Orleans, December 1970)