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ERIC Number: ED051108
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1971
Pages: 8
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
A Study To Determine the Value of Providing the Learner with Regularly Scheduled Assessment Items To Assess Behavioral Acquisition.
Carter, Heather L.
This study tested the hypothesis that preservice elementary education majors given an operational definition of stated performance objectives in the form of assessment items demonstrate higher acquisition rate with respect to the described behaviors than those students not given the operational definition. The study population was two groups of students registered in a mathematics methods course. Eight weeks of instruction followed a pretest. Group A was provided with behavioral objectives before the class began and assessment items after every session. Group B was given only the objectives. A test composed of criterion items was administered to each group at the end of the second 8-week course. The scores were analyzed and significant differences were observed at the .05 level between the groups. Group A had gained significantly more of the stated behaviors. The study indicates that there is an advantage when the learners are given an operational definition of the objective in the form of assessment items. It would seem that both curriculum developers and instructors should provide the learner with such a definition at the end of every instructional sequence. The assessment should provide a careful matching with the stated objectives. Further questions are whether there is as great an advantage if the assessment items are given only on alternate occasions or on one occasion in three. (Author/MBM)
Heather L. Carter, Research and Development Center for Teacher Education, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Texas Univ., Austin.
Identifiers: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of American Educational Research Association, New York, 1971