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ERIC Number: ED048916
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1970-Mar
Pages: 29
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
A Successful Attempt to Train Children in Coordination of Projective Space.
Miller, Jack W.; Miller, Haroldine G.
The objective of the investigation was to develop and test procedures for training children in coordination of projective space. (Projective concepts involve apparent distance, relative position, shape of figures, and other topological factors. A person with a command of projective space sees objects as a coordinated system of figures in space.) A total of 36 8-year-old middle class children who could not coordinate projective space were trained in a carefully sequenced instructional program embodying heirarchies based on Piagetian theory as one dimension, Brunerian modes of representation as a second, and complexity of task as the third. Gains in ability to coordinate projective space, as measured by the Perspective Ability Test developed by the senior author, exceeded those of a control group. There were no significant differences between performance gains of males and females. It is recommended that previous studies that suggested Piaget's normative process is immutable--and that basic cognitive development cannot be enhanced significantly through instruction--be reevaluated in terms of theoretical deficiencies, inappropriate methodology, measurement problems, and other factors. The possibility of successful training on other spatial tasks and with younger children should be considered. Appendixes provide statistical data, training lessons, and explanations of Piagetian theory. (Authors/DR)
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: George Peabody Coll. for Teachers, Nashville, TN. Inst. on School Learning and Individual Differences.
Identifiers: Perspective (Psychology); Piaget (Jean)
Note: Paper presented at the American Educational Research Association Conference, Minneapolis, Minnesota, March, 1970