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ERIC Number: ED048423
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1970-Aug
Pages: 13
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Race, Intelligence, and Learning: Some Consequences of the Misuse of Test Results.
Epps, Edgar G.
Arthur R. Jensen's article presented no new data: it only reorganized a biased sample of already existent data. Nevertheless, it has been taken by opponents of school integration as definitive scientific evidence of the innate inequality of black and white students. Jensen and Van Den Haag advocate additional studies on individual learning ability before schools are given funds to help them desegregate. They also ask for an "objective examination of the educational effects of compulsory desegregation." Although this would slow school integration, such studies would be useful if they also included data on socioeconomic status and race of persons in the same classroom, racial attitudes of classroom teachers and school administrators, presence of ability tracking, the quality of classroom interaction, etc. Even without these qualifications, no studies have found that the performance of black students declines as a result of desegregation. Desegregation must have high priority, if to do no more than prevent the unequal distribution of educational resources. Jensen's articles and those of others provide school personnel and policy makers with an excuse for systematic discrimination against minority groups and other poor children. (JM)
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Jensen (Arthur R)
Note: Paper delivered at the American Sociological Association Meeting, Washington, D.C., 1970