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ERIC Number: ED038188
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1970-Mar-2
Pages: 12
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Southwestern Cooperative Educational Laboratory Interaction Observation Schedule (SCIOS): A System for Analyzing Teacher-Pupil Interaction in the Affective Domain.
Bemis, Katherine A.; Liberty, Paul G.
The Southwestern Cooperative Interaction Observation Schedule (SCIOS) is a classroom observation instrument designed to record pupil-teacher interaction. The classification of pupil behavior is based on Krathwohl's (1964) theory of the three lowest levels of the affective domain. The levels are (1) receiving: the learner should be sensitized to the existence of certain phenomena and stimuli, (2) responding: the student's responses go beyond merely attending to the phenomena, and (3) valuing: the student's behavior is consistent and stable enough to have taken on the characteristics of a belief or attitude. Classification of teacher behavior was based on Sullivan's (1953) social-psychological theory of personality. There are two major categories of teacher behavior: (1) behavior that results in tension-reduction and need satisfaction for the student, and (2) behavior that increases student tension or anxiety. Use of the SCIOS in the classroom takes 16 minutes with an additional 5 minutes for form information, such as teacher's code number and the date and time of the class. During the first 5 minutes in the class, an observer records subjective impressions of visual aids and classroom atmosphere. The observer than records teacher and pupil behaviors in eight sections on the schedule, each requiring a 2-minute time segment. A copy of the observation schedule is included in this report. (MH)
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: Office of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC. Bureau of Research.
Authoring Institution: Southwestern Cooperative Educational Lab., Albuquerque, NM.
Identifiers: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the annual convention of the American Educational Research Association, Minneapolis, Minnesota, March 2-6, 1970