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ERIC Number: ED035892
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1970
Pages: 12
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Transformational Theory and English as a Second Language/Dialect.
Scott, Charles T.
Noam Chomsky's numerous criticisms of formerly well-accepted beliefs about the nature of language learning (e.g. in his review of Skinner's "Verbal Behavior") have led to a diversity of views regarding the potential application of transformational theory to the teaching of English as a second language/dialect. It seems clear, moreover, that his criticisms have shaken the faith of many teachers in the efficiency of the audio-lingual approach to second language/dialect teaching. While Chomsky's views have been directed towards problems in the general theory of human language acquisition rather than to principles involved in the teaching and learning of second languages/dialects, the writer of this article does not think that it has been a mistake on the part of ESL (English Second Language) specialists to attempt to relate his views to the latter situation. This paper explores a number of notions developed in transformational theory which appear to have direct bearing on a theory of language acquisition; these notions are discussed with a view to their relevance in the second language/dialect situation. Tentative conclusions concerning the pedagogical effects of these notions are drawn, with appropriate distinctions made between effects on the teaching of English as a second language and as a second dialect. (Author/FWB)
Publications Department, School of Languages and Linguistics, Georgetown Univ., Washington, D.C. 20007 (Monograph Series No. 22, $2.95)
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Georgetown Univ., Washington, DC. School of Languages and Linguistics.
Identifiers: N/A
Note: Article in Report of the 20th Annual Round Table Meeting on Ling. and Lang. Studies, Linguistics and the Teaching of Standard English to Speakers of Other Languages or Dialects