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ERIC Number: ED035349
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1969-May
Pages: 6
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Business Schools and the University. Organizational Considerations.
Gross, Edward
From a sociological standpoint, universities may be viewed as organizations. In seeking to understand organizations, it is necessary to have both "knowledge of structure"--how the organization is put together and how it works--and "knowledge of intervention"--how to intervene in it to achieve some desired change. Within organizations of any type, these 2 kinds of knowledge are usually held by certain "units." In the university, both are concentrated in the business school. As all faculty members represent a valuable resource for "intervention," they must be urged to take a more active role in the governance of the university. Studies have indicated that the most prestigious universities devote the least amount of time to students and suffer most from serious student rebellions. The "university concerns" of faculty--teaching, student advising, committee memberships--are often subordinated to their "scholarly concerns"--research, writing, etc. It is not necessary to alter the overall amount of time spent in either, but the "work flow" can be changed to achieve results more efficiently. The university should allow the professor to devote full time to "scholarly concerns" for 1 quarter of each year, and to "university concerns" for the remaining 2. This "scholar-university alternation" plan should be an optional, but standard practice. Because of their positions, business school deans should take the lead in "interventions." (DS)
American Association of Collegiate Schools of Business, 101 N. Skinner Blvd., Prince Hall, St. Louis, Mo. 63130 ($2.00 - complete proceedings)
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: N/A
Note: Address delivered at Annual Meeting of American Association of Collegiate Schools of Business, Detroit, Michigan, May 1969; Article in conference proceedings