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50 Years of ERIC
50 Years of ERIC
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ERIC Number: ED031483
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1967
Pages: 482
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Structural Versus Traditional Approaches to the Teaching of English Grammar in High Schools.
Zimmerman, Howard Clinton
A study of the relative effectiveness of three approaches to teaching selected aspects of English grammar to 299 10th-grade students of average ability (17 class-size groups) was made in Lane County, Oregon. Five groups were taught using structural linguistics concepts; six groups employed traditional methods, materials, and approaches; and six served as control groups with instruction left to the teacher's discretion. Before instruction, students were equated by test scores, general age, and sex characteristics; and teachers were given inservice training, counselled in the use of instructional materials, and tested for fidelity to their teaching approaches. After a year of grammar instruction, the students were tested again with both standardized and experimental instruments. The major findings ofthe study were that (1) the performance means of the structural-approach groups and the traditional-approach groups did not differ significantly; (2) significant differences at the .01 level were found between the performance means of the undefined approach groups and each of the well-defined structural- and traditional-approach groups; (3) significant differences at the .01 level were found between performance means for boys and girls; (4) none of the approaches improved students' attitudes toward grammar. (Author/LM)
University Microfilms, A Xerox Company, 300 N. Zeeb Rd., Ann Arbor, Michigan 48103 (Order No. 67-16, 190, MF $6.15, Xerography $21.85)
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: N/A
Note: Ed.D. Dissertation, University of Oregon.