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ERIC Number: ED031310
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1967
Pages: 10
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Personality Development in Disadvantaged Four-Year-old Boys: Observations With Play Techniques.
Hirsch, Jay G.; Borowitz, Gene H.
Research Report, v4 n5 1967. (Institute for Juvenile Research, 322 E. Ohio St., Chicago, Illinois 60611)
Thirty-one 4-year-old Negro boys attending a research preschool in Chicago were observed during a play session. Preliminary evaluation of the data from the observations indicated a marked heterogeneity in the subjects with regard to verbal facility, cognitive development, and quality and nature of object relationships. Poor correlation was found between degree of verbal facility and level of cognitive development. The children fell into three groups: (1) probable future academic achievers, (2) probable non-achievers, and (3) difficult-to-predict. Group (1) showed concern over state-appropriate developmental issues, a minimum of conflict regarding earlier stages, and a capacity to move toward an integrative resolution, and showed superior cognitive differentiation. Group (2) manifested minimal concern over development, substantial conflicts regarding earlier stages, and disintergration. Group (3) showed varying degrees to both good and bad characteristics. There is wide variation in the individual personality development of the disadvantaged. Explanations of underachievement, measured only by cognitive and/or language factors, is adequate. There is a great need for study on the relationship of the socialization process during the first four years of life to later academic achievement. (WD)
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: Illinois State Dept. of Mental Health and Developmental Disabilities, Springfield.; Kenneth F. Montgomery Charitable Foundation, Chicago, IL.
Authoring Institution: Institute for Juvenile Research, Chicago, IL.
Identifiers: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development, New York, New York, March 30, 1967