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ERIC Number: ED030406
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1968-Sep
Pages: 23
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
The Role of Intellective Variables in Achievement and Attrition of Associate Degree Students at the York Campus for the Years 1959 to 1963.
Elias, Edward M.; Lindsay, Carl A.
The purpose of this study was to determine if there were any systematic differences in intellective factors between graduates and non-graduates in the associate degree programs that may be useful for improving the selection process. Ten predictor and eight criterion variables were measured for all associate degree freshman classes at the college for the years 1959 through 1963. Total number of subjects was 328. Predictor data were collected from the Admissions and Counseling records of the subjects and criterion data were collected from the subjects' transcripts. Descriptive statistics were calculated and t-tests run comparing graduates with non-graduates. A series of regression problems were also run. Findings revealed that the best predictor of the percentage of a given class who will graduate in six terms was the first-term GPA. The overall increase in mean GPA between first and sixth terms was attributed to the poor achievement and resultant dropping-out of non-graduates by the end of their freshman year. An optimum subset of four intellective variables for predicting three achievement criteria was determined by regression analyses. If entrance requirements are increased and instructional and grading practices remain the same, a higher proportion of entering freshmen should be graduated, while the probability is increased of rejecting applicants who would have graduated if admitted. Such problems must be faced under any selective system of admission and final decisions are dictated by school admissions philosophy. (RM)
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Pennsylvania State Univ., York.
Identifiers: Pennsylvania