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ERIC Number: ED025754
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1968-Nov-15
Pages: 162
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Pronominal Reference in Thai, Burmese, and Vietnamese. University of California Publications in Linguistics, Volume 52.
Cooke, Joseph R.
This study in Thai, Burmese, and Vietnamese is concerned with forms, meanings, and usage relating to personal pronouns and also other forms which, like them, are used as sentence subjects or objects with first or second person meanings--such phenomena being termed "pronominal." Three types of forms are seen to occur pronominally in the languages under consideration: personal pronouns, kintype nouns, and name nouns, and each of these is described structurally. Further treatment includes the following: lists of forms with meanings described in some detail; analysis of semantic features of personal pronouns in terms of person, sex, age, status, intimacy, nonrestraint, etc.; consideration of literal and displaced meanings of kin terms; and discussion of personal and cultural aspects of usage. Then the various formal, semantic, and cultural phenomena are compared and contrasted in the three languages. It is hoped that this work will contribute to linguistic knowledge and understanding by (1) providing a compendium of information on comparatively little-known, but linguistically and culturally significant, areas of all three languages; (2) organizing and analyzing a rich but confusing mass of material; and (3) setting forth a body of comparative and contrastive data showing remarkable parallels and similarities (as well as differences) in pronominal usage. (AMM)
University of California Press, 2223 Fulton Street, Berkeley, Cal. 94707 ($4.50).
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: American Council of Learned Societies, New York, NY.
Authoring Institution: California Univ., Berkeley.
Identifiers: Kinship Terms; Status Terms (Linguistics)
Note: Doctoral dissertation in linguistics, University of California at Berkeley, 1965.