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ERIC Number: ED025370
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1969-Feb
Pages: 22
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Potential Contributions by the Behavioral Sciences to Effective Preparation Programs for Teachers of Mexican-American Children.
Ramirez, Manuel III
Summary information of several research projects is presented to show that underprivileged children are not prepared to cope with intellectual and social demands of the school. Results of several value scales administered to both Mexican American and Anglo junior high, senior high, and college students indicate that Mexican American students agree with authoritarian ideology to a significantly higher degree than do Anglo students. This is attributed to rearing in a family atmosphere emphasizing father domination, strict child rearing practices, submission and obedience to the will of authority figures, strict separation of sex roles, and relationships based on dominance and submission. Evidence indicates that Mexican Americans express attitudes toward education that are significantly more unfavorable than those of Anglos. Moreover, value orientations developed in the homes of Mexican Americans are contradicted by the value system of the schools. The study concludes that Mexican Americans' adjustment to school is being hindered by their avoidance reaction to school tasks and school personnel. Preparation programs designed to introduce teachers to practical uses of anthropological methods are seen as a beneficial factor toward increasing teacher sensitivity to Mexican American problems. (DA)
Manager, Dup. Serv., NMSU, P.O. Box 3CB, Las Cruces, N.M. 88001 ($1.00, over 5 copies $0.85 each)
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: Office of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: ERIC Clearinghouse on Rural Education and Small Schools, Las Cruces, NM.
Identifiers: N/A
Note: Paper prepared for the Conf. on Teacher Educ. for Mexican Americans, New Mexico State Unive., February 13-15, 1969.