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ERIC Number: ED024345
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1968-Sep-2
Pages: 8
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Extending Psychology's Impact Through Existing Community Institutions.
Bard, Morton
Universities have responded to increasingly imperative societal demands by expanding their public service activities, often in the form of social action programs. This development has not extended to the field of psychology, in which the university psychological center could effectively serve to collaborate on university-community efforts. Such a center at the City College in New York has been conducting an experimental project in which a unit of 9 white and 9 black policemen, biracially paired, were trained to combine their normal work with the skills of family crisis intervention specialists. They receive regular consultative support from the Center staff. Their work covers a West Harlem area of 85,000 people to whom they are available at the time of a crisis, 24 hours a day. In 1 year the unit served 665 families, enhancing police-community relations in the area. The Police Department has been provided with a capacity it previously lacked for reducing certain types of crime and injuries to policemen, and the community has benefitted from direct university involvement. The results clearly demonstrate that university psychological services can be successfully provided through existing community agencies, and that the use of these agencies may be more logical and economical than the creation of new ones. The Center is working on a similar project with the Fire Department. (WM)
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: City University of New York City College
Note: Paper presented at the 76th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association, San Francisco, California, September 2, 1968.