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ERIC Number: ED023737
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1966
Pages: 11
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Class Struggles in the Schools.
Sexton, Patricia Cayo
The major issue in urban education is class conflict. The polarity of the "haves" and "have-nots" limits the schools' services to the latter group because of the generally moderate stance of most liberal school board members and their insufficient zeal in pressing the grievances of the have-nots. Bureaucratic resistance and the role of conservatives in paring school budgets are further obstructions. This kind of class conflict also permeates congressional and state aid to education. Documentary evidence of conditions in Chicago and New York City schools corroborate the statement that the class conflict is reflected in school inequalities and class-biased training. Ethnic roles are also interconnected with class roles, with the Jewish community often acting as the "swing" group on polarized issues. A new and difficult problem for urban schools is the massive task of racial acculturation. Breakthroughs may possibly come through political pressures, increased civil rights activity, amalgamation of lower-class groups, Federal aid programs and voluntary and private efforts. Increased college opportunities, instructional innovations, unionization of teachers, and decentralization may also improve the educational quality of urban schools. (NH)
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Illinois; Illinois (Chicago); New York (New York)
Note: Article published in The Urban School Crisis, by League for Industrial Democracy/United Federation of Teachers, AFL-CIO, New York, 1966.