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ERIC Number: ED023475
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1968-Jun
Pages: 52
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
A Standardized Neurological Examination: Its Validity in Predicting School Achievement in Head Start and Other Populations. Final Report.
Ozer, Mark N.; Deem, Michael A.
A neurological examination has been developed to discover children with physiologically based learning problems who do not manifest asymmetrical functioning. This study attempts to determine the validity of this examination by its accuracy in predicting the performance of children in a summer Head Start program. Validity was determined by comparing the examination results with results of the Metropolitan Readiness Test (MRT) and then testing both groups of predictions by examining the actual performance of the children on the criterion measures; that is, the achievement tests. The subjects of this study were 43 first grade Negro children, half of which had participated in a summer Head Start program and all of which represented a population meeting the criteria for funding by the Office of Economic Opportunity (OEO), and 45 Negro first grade children who were from schools not meeting the OEO criteria. Both groups were administered the Neurological Screening Test, the MRT, certain tests from the Stanford Achievement Battery, and various psychological tests. Although the results of this study indicate that the neurological test was not consistently as good a predictor of school performance as the MRT, it did demonstrate it had predictive value. It should be noted that the neurological test takes about 15 minutes to administer while the MRT takes one to two hours. (WD)
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: Office of Economic Opportunity, Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: George Washington Univ., Washington, DC. School of Medicine.; Children's Hospital of the District of Columbia, Washington, DC.
Identifiers: Metropolitan Readiness Tests; Neurological Examination; Project Headstart