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50 Years of ERIC
50 Years of ERIC
The Education Resources Information Center (ERIC) is celebrating its 50th Birthday! First opened on May 15th, 1964 ERIC continues the long tradition of ongoing innovation and enhancement.

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ERIC Number: ED018301
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1967-Nov-10
Pages: 2
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
TEACHING CONTENT IN SPANISH IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL.
PENA, ALBAR A.
RESEARCH IN THE AREA OF SECOND LANGUAGE LEARNING SUPPORTS THE BELIEF THAT LANGUAGE STUDY SHOULD BEGIN AS EARLY AS KINDERGARTEN OR THE FIRST GRADE. EARLY TRAINING IN LANGUAGE STUDY CAN ENHANCE AND REINFORCE THE KNOWLEDGE GAINED IN AREAS SUCH AS SCIENCE, SOCIAL STUDIES, OR READING. THEREFORE, WITH THE SPANISH-SPEAKING PEOPLE, IT IS LOGICAL TO TEACH SPANISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. THE ASSUMPTION IS THAT BY ACHIEVING COMPETENCY, MATURITY, AND ORAL AND WRITTEN FLUENCY IN SPANISH, THE LEARNINGS ACQUIRED FOR SPANISH CAN BE TRANSFERRED TO THE TASK OF LEARNING ENGLISH, AND SUCCESS IN SPANISH MAY ALSO PROVIDE A STRONG MOTIVATING FORCE TO DO WELL IN OTHER AREAS OF LEARNING. WITH THIS PREMISE IN MIND, THE TEXAS UNIVERSITY SAN ANTONIO LANGUAGE RESEARCH PROJECT WAS INITIATED TO DEVELOP ORAL LANGUAGE, BOTH ENGLISH AND SPANISH, THROUGH AN INTENSIVE AUDIO-LINGUAL APPROACH. A SERIES OF LESSON PLANS WAS THEN DEVISED. IT IS HOPED THAT THE RESULTS FROM THIS STUDY CAN PROVIDE SUBSTANTIAL EVIDENCE TO SUPPORT THE HYPOTHESIS THAT INSTRUCTION IN THE NATIVE LANGUAGE OF THE LEARNER THROUGH THE USE OF AUDIO-LINGUAL TECHNIQUES AND CAREFULLY SEQUENCED PLANS FOR DEVELOPING COGNITIVE ABILITIES PRODUCES MEASURABLE ACADEMIC SUCCESS. THIS REPORT WAS PRESENTED TO THE ANNUAL CONFERENCE OF THE SOUTHWEST COUNCIL OF FOREIGN LANGUAGE TEACHERS, EL PASO, TEXAS, NOVEMBER 10-11, 1967. (ES)
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: SAN ANTONIO LANGUAGE RESEARCH PROJECT; University of Texas