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ERIC Number: ED016236
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1968
Pages: 1
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
CONTINUITY AND CHANGE IN AMERICAN NEGRO DIALECTS.
STEWART, WILLIAM A.
IN AN EARLIER ARTICLE (ALSO PUBLISHED IN THE FLORIDA FOREIGN LANGUAGE REPORTER) THE AUTHOR CITED EVIDENCE FOR BELIEF THAT THE NEGRO FIELD SLAVES "SPOKE A VARIETY OF ENGLISH WHICH WAS IN FACT A TRUE CREOLE LANGUAGE" AND THAT STRUCTURAL TRACES OF THIS CREOLE PREDECESSOR MAY BE HEARD TODAY IN THE NONSTANDARD ENGLISH SPEECH PATTERNS OF AMERICAN NEGROES (ESPECIALLY CHILDREN). IN THIS ARTICLE HE COMPARES GRAMMATICAL PATTERNS OF NEGRO NONSTANDARD, WHITE STANDARD AND NONSTANDARD, GULLAH, ENGLISH-BASED CREOLES OF THE CARRIBEAN, AND WEST AFRICAN PIDGIN ENGLISH, AND HE CALLS FOR A COMPLETE REASSESSMENT OF CURRENT DIALECT STUDIES CONCERNING THE RELATIONSHIPS AMONG THESE VARIETIES OF ENGLISH. IT MAY BE THAT "THE WORD-FORM SIMILARITIES BETWEEN NON-STANDARD NEGRO DIALECTS AND NON-STANDARD WHITE DIALECTS ARE THE RESULT OF A RELATIVELY SUPERFICIAL MERGING PROCESS" THROUGH "MINOR PRONUNCIATION CHANGES AND VOCABULARY SUBSTITUTIONS" WITH THE CREOLE GRAMMATICAL PATTERNS REMAINING RESISTANT TO THIS SUBSTITUTION PROCESS. THE TEACHER, UNAWARE OF THE PROCESSES INVOLVED, MAY CONCENTRATE ON THE MORE OBVIOUS WORD-FORM DIFFERENCES AND MISS THE GRAMMATICAL DIFFERENCES. REALISTIC LANGUAGE PROGRAMS FOR THE DISADVANTAGED NEGRO CHILD MUST TAKE INTO ACCOUNT "ETHNICALLY CORRELATED DIALECT DIFFERENCES." THIS ARTICLE WILL BE PUBLISHED IN THE SPRING 1968 ISSUE OF THE FLORIDA FOREIGN LANGUAGE REPORTER, 801 N.E. 177 STREET, NORTH MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA 33162. (JD)
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: N/A