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ERIC Number: ED015976
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1967-Nov
Pages: 22
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
SCHOOL DESEGREGATION--PROGRESS IN EIGHT CITIES.
STOUT, ROBERT T.
THIS REPORT SUMMARIZES RESEARCH ON THE FACTORS INVOLVED IN THE DECISIONS OF LOCAL SCHOOL BOARDS IN EIGHT CITIES TO DESEGREGATE SCHOOL SYSTEMS, AND DISCUSSES THE RESPONSES OF THE COMMUNITIES TO SUCH DECISIONS. IN EACH OF THE CITIES, WHERE DECISIONS WERE MADE IN FAVOR OF SCHOOL DESEGREGATION, THE SCHOOL BOARDS EITHER PRESENTED THE ISSUE TO THE PUBLIC FOR ITS SUPPORT OR TREATED IT AS A CLOSED POLICY DECISION NOT REQUIRING PUBLIC CONSIDERATION. ANY INDECISIVENESS ON THE PART OF THE MEMBERS OF THE SCHOOL BOARDS STEMMED FROM FEARS OF WHITE RESENTMENT AND COMMUNITY CONFLICT. IN COMMUNITIES WHERE THE PUBLIC WAS LEAST INVOLVED IN THE SCHOOL BOARD'S DECISION THE DESEGREGATION PLANS MET WITH LEAST COMMUNITY RESISTANCE. IN ALL EIGHT CITIES ONCE THE LOCAL SCHOOL GOVERNMENT FORMALLY ADOPTED THE PLAN THE PUBLIC TENDED TO ACCEPT IT AS INEVITABLE AND LEGITIMATE. OFTEN SCHOOL BOARDS TREATED DESEGREGATION AS REQUIRING ONLY AN "ENCAPSULATED" SINGLE EFFORT RATHER THAN CONTINUOUS ACTION. SCHOOL SUPERINTENDENTS, WHO PLAYED A KEY ROLE IN THE ENTIRE DESEGREGATION PROCESS, WERE HANDICAPPED BY SUCH FACTORS AS A LACK OF EVIDENCE PROVING THE POSITIVE EFFECTS OF SCHOOL DESEGREGATION. NEVERTHELESS THEY HAD SUCH RESOURCES AS CONTROL OVER THE ALLOCATION OF SCHOOL FUNDS AND THE POWER TO RECRUIT SYMPATHETIC STAFF. THIS PAPER WAS PREPARED FOR THE NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON EQUAL EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY IN AMERICA'S CITIES, SPONSORED BY THE U.S. COMMISSION ON CIVIL RIGHTS, WASHINGTON, D.C., NOVEMBER 16-18, 1967. (LB)
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: N/A