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ERIC Number: ED015493
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1967-Sep-4
Pages: 15
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
THE SHARING OF RESPONSIBILITY.
DARLEY, JOHN
AN OVERVIEW OF A SERIES OF STUDIES ON BYSTANDER INTERVENTION IN EMERGENCY SITUATIONS IS PRESENTED. IN THE FIRST EXPERIMENT, TWO, THREE, AND SIX MEMBER GROUPS REACTED TO HEARING, BUT NOT SEEING, ONE MEMBER OF THE GROUP HAVING AN EPILEPTIC SEIZURE. AN INCREASE IN THE NUMBER OF OBSERVERS PERCEIVED TO BE PRESENT DECREASED THE SPEED OF RESPONSE. WHEN VARYING THE TYPE OF OTHERS PRESENT, IT WAS FOUND THAT NEITHER SEX NOR PREVIOUS MEDICAL EXPERIENCE CAUSED ANY CHANGES IN REACTION SPEED. IN ANOTHER EXPERIMENT, A QUESTION WAS DIRECTLY ASKED OF--(1) THE BYSTANDER, (2) THE BYSTANDER AND ANOTHER PERSON, OR (3) THE OTHER PERSON, WHO IN ALL CASES RESPONDED BY MISINFORMING THE QUESTIONER. IT WAS CONCLUDED THAT WHEN DIRECT INTERVENTION IS NEEDED, VARIATIONS IN THE SITUATIONS DETERMINE THE DEGREE OF RESPONSIBILITY FOR INTERVENTION. IN OTHER STUDIES, IT WAS FOUND THAT WHEN TWO SUBJECTS KNOW EACH OTHER, THEY ARE MORE LIKELY TO RESPOND QUICKLY IN THE SEIZURE EXPERIMENT, AND THAT PREVIOUS ACQUAINTANCE WITH THE VICTIM, FOR EVEN ONE MINUTE ENCOUNTER, INCREASED RESPONSE SPEED SIGNIFICANTLY. RESULTS ARE USED TO EXPLAIN THE FAILURE OF BYSTANDERS TO HELP IN EMERGENCIES IN LARGE CITIES. THIS PAPER WAS PRESENTED AT THE AMERICAN PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION CONVENTION, WASHINGTON, D.C., SEPTEMBER 4, 1967. (PR)
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: N/A