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ERIC Number: ED015481
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1967-Jun
Pages: 9
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
WRITING, A THINKING PROCESS.
ARAPOFF, NANCY
A NEW METHOD OF TEACHING WRITING TO STUDENTS OF ENGLISH AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE IS PRESENTED. THE AUTHOR DEFINES LEARNING TO WRITE, WHICH IS ESSENTIALLY DIFFERENT FROM THE OTHER LANGUAGE SKILLS (ORAL PRODUCTION, GRAMMAR, AND READING), AS A PROCESS THAT REQUIRES ACTIVE THOUGHT IN THE NECESSARY SELECTION AND ORGANIZATION OF EXPERIENCE. WRITING INSTRUCTION, THEREFORE, MUST INCLUDE EXERCISES NECESSITATING INTENSE CONCENTRATION. IN PLANNING A WRITING CURRICULUM THE FOLLOWING POINTS SHOULD BE KEPT IN MIND--(1) GRAMMAR AND READING ARE NOT GOALS IN THEMSELVES BUT INDISPENSIBLE TOOLS, (2) WRITING HAS CERTAIN STRUCTURAL DIFFERENCES FROM SPEECH, AND (3) FREE COMPOSITION OFTEN RESULTS IN WORD-FOR-WORD TRANSLATION AND UNGRAMMATICAL RESULTS. THE COMPLEXITY OF THE WRITING MAY BE CONTROLLED BY CONTROLLING THE PURPOSE OF THE WRITING. THE THREE GENERAL TYPES OF EXPOSITORY PROSE MOST USED IN CLASSROOMS ARE--(1) LECTURE AND READING NOTES WHICH REPORT FACTS, (2) ANSWERS TO EXAMINATION QUESTIONS WHICH EXPLAIN THEM, AND (3) RESEARCH OR CRITICAL PAPERS WHICH EVALUATE. EACH OF THESE THREE PURPOSES REQUIRES A SELECTING AND ORGANIZING TASK OF DIFFERING COMPLEXITY. ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE VARIOUS STAGES OF WRITING FROM SIMPLE TO COMPLEX ARE GIVEN. THIS PAPER WAS PRESENTED AT THE TESOL CONVENTION, APRIL 1967, AND IS PUBLISHED IN THE "TESOL QUARTERLY," VOLUME 1, NUMBER 2, JUNE 1967, INSTITUTE OF LANGUAGES AND LINGUISTICS, GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY, WASHINGTON, D.C. 20007. (AMM)
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages.
Identifiers: University of Hawaii